Politics 09 March 2014 203 548

Crimea: Unmasking revolution


The fires have been put out in central Kiev and Ukraine's elected president has fled. But while some cheer the ouster of what they saw as a corrupt regime, others fear far worse from those who have seized power. The skeptics include many members of the country's Russian-speaking and ethnic Russian population. In Crimea, where ethnic Russians constitute a majority, many refuse to accept Ukraine's new leaders, especially the ones that venerate World War Two-era Nazi collaborator Stepan Bandera. As volunteers queue to defend Crimea from Euromaidan's victors, many are asking: does Crimea belong in Ukraine, or could it become part of Russia?



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